Ann Nyberg Bradley

Ann Bradley has an in-depth understanding of psychology and biomechanics of both horse and rider. She effectively applies that understanding when teaching riders how to better communicate with their horses.

BACKGROUND

Ann's riding began at an early age with Pony Club and lessons. She has ridden and shown hunter/jumper, worked on a cattle ranch in Wyoming, been involved in the racing industry specifically the process of conditioning racehorses and bringing them to speed. Dressage was next, and her current interest is French Classical Dressage training.  Ann's personal riding has always been different than her teaching though.  Ann teaches basic horsemanship skills to riders of all disciplines - Wesern, English, Trail/Pleasure, and Gaited, as well as arena or outdoor riding. 

 

PRIMARY FOCUS OF EDUCATION PROGRAM FOR STUDENTS

Safety first, above all else.  Ann addresses safety, in large part, by helping riders find an aligned and balanced position in the saddle.  Not all riders need to make changes, but if safety is compromised due to faulty position, that is address before proceding. Only when the rider is able to maintain a balanced position, then the rider's effectiveness via the aids is pursued.  Finally, riding should be fun!

 

PRIMARY FOCUS OF HORSE TRAINING PROGRAM

Teaching and training are dependent upon the underlying state of being of both rider and horse. The horse first need to be calm and attentive, then specific movements can be trained with relative easse. Next, he should be interactive in his own training.  She focuses on how a horse learns and performs rather than what he performs. 

 

PHILOSOPHY

If both horse and rider are calm, attentive, willing to listen to one another, confident, and trusting, then training goes along smoothly. 

 

APPROACH or METHOD

Ann begins with getting the horse calm and attentive, then looks for the qualities of trust, respect, confidence, and willingness. The first thing the rider needs to become aware of is the power of their underlying inentions and expectations. Once the rider learns to project a clear and direct intention, then needs to learn to expect the best.

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